© 2019 TRIXIE Hellas E. E.
17o km Spaton Avenue 190 04 Spata, Attica, Greece Τel +30 210 6025538 Fax +30 216 7002868 mail: sales@trixiehellas.gr
Follow us:
Come Together 2022 Athens, Greece
Cleopatra was actually Greek, not Egyptian While she was born in Egypt, Cleopatra was the last of the Macedonian Greek dynasty which ruled Egypt for nearly three centuries after Alexander the Great’s death in 323 BC.
Welcome to our Come Together! We are very excited to finally have the opportunity to host in partnership with TRIXIE your visit to this amazing, historical and magical land. Along with the program, we have prepared some background information about the sites we will be visiting. Also, we have included links to several other venues along with a few quirky greek facts to lighten your day. Last but not least, we thank our partners and friends from TRIXIE for making this engaging and supportive events an occasion we all look forward to attend. Enjoy your visit! “Kalos Irthate!” Welcome
A Brief History of “The Temple of Poseidon”, Sounion, Attica
Majestic Cape Sounion, a strategic point rising above the Aegean sea about 70 kilometers away from Athens in the southern region of Attica, was known by Ancient Greeks as the “Sacred Cape.” On top of this 60 meter cliff stands one of the most important sanctuaries in the region: the temple dedicated to Poseidon, God of the Sea. Built between 444 and 440 BC, the temple was constructed of marble from the valley of Agrilesa, about four kilometers north of the Sounio Cape. The architect is thought to be Ictinus (or Iktinos), who built the Temple of Hephaestus in the Ancient agora in Athens. He built the 16 columns at the Temple of Poseidon in a way that ensured they would stand the test of time and resist the harshness of the environment, and made the Doric columns more slender at the top so they would look taller. History and Legends As with many other monuments and sanctuaries around Greece, historical facts about the Temple of Poseidon in Sounion are intertwined with bits of legend. For example, it is thought to be the spot where Athenian King Aegeus killed himself by jumping off the cliff. Aegeus, who had positioned himself at Sounion to look out for the return of his son Theseus from Crete, saw the black sails on the ship and mistakenly thought Theseus had been killed by the Minotaur, a creature with the head of a bull and the body of a man. In fact, young Theseus was victorious but had forgotten to replace the black sails on his ship with white ones upon returning, which ultimately led to his father’s death. And so, in commemoration, Aegeus’ name was given to the Aegean Sea. And in the Odyssey, Homer wrote that Sounion was the place where King Menelaus of Sparta buried his helmsman, who died at his post while rounding the cape.
The Temple In Greek mythology, Poseidon, brother of Zeus, was the God of the Sea, so it is no wonder that he was highly revered and worshipped in a country with over 13,500 kilometers of coastline. Ancient Greeks, especially seamen, believed storms were signs of Poseidon’s wrath, and therefore the temple at Cape Sounion was a sacred place where sailors and the general population came to offer animal sacrifices and other gifts to appease him and find favor. The temple was built according to a hexastyle plan, with a front portico with six Doric columns. It was rectangular, with a colonnade on all four sides, and had a frieze depicting the tale of Theseus and the Battle of Centaurs. The 16 columns, 15 of which are still standing today, are fewer in number compared with other temples dating from the same period, a feature common among other ancient temples built near the sea such as the Temple of Aphaia in Aegina. The remnants of the temple’s marble sculptures are now displayed at the National Archaeological Museum of Athens and the Mineralogical Museum of Lavrio, with one column on display at the British Museum in England. British Romantic poet Lord Byron carved his name at the base of one of the remaining columns during a visit in 1810 when he was touring Europe before rising to fame.
Changing of the Guard
This ceremony take place at the Presidential Mansion and at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, which is off Syntagma Square below the Hellenic Parliament. The Evzones , or Evzoni (which means “well-armed”), is the name of several historical elite light infantry and mountain units of the Greek Army. Today, it refers to the members of the Presidential Guard, an elite ceremonial unit that guards The Greek Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, The Presidential Mansion and The Gate of Evzones camp in Athens City. An Evzone or known as a Tsoliás stands in front of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the Greek Parliament . Every hour of the day, on the hour, there is a change of the guard. The duties of the soldiers are part of a ceremonial nature.
Every soldier guards for about an hour, 3 times in total every 48 hours. Throughout these 60 minutes, they have to stand perfectly still until it is time to switch with another guard. During the changing, they work in pairs so they can perfectly coordinate their moves. The soldiers of the Presidential Guard are selected according to their height, excellent physical condition and psychological state as well as character and morality. Furthermore they follow a hard training before they become part of this honorary unit. Apart from staying still, the soldiers must also not make any face or eye move and must not show any expression. Their uniform of the Presidential Guard has a historical meaning. It refers to the uniform of the Kleftes and Armatoloi, two groups of Greek warriors during the War of Independence against the Ottomans. In fact, the white skirt of the uniform has 400 folds to represent the 400 years of Ottoman occupation over the Greeks. The most visible item of this uniform is the fustanella, a kilt-like garment. Their distinctive dress turned them into a popular image for the Greek soldier, especially among foreigners.
Careful where you step! One of the quirkiest facts about Athens is that you can’t wear high heels when touring ancient historic sites like the Acropolis because you could “wound” the monuments. So for your own comfort and the protection of the ruins when visiting archeological sites in Greece, keep in mind to wear comfortable flat travel sandals or sport shoes…
Things are not always as they seem... The pristine, gleaming white, marble monuments, temples and statues of Greece , which we see today, didn’t start out that way. Originally, when they were created, thousands of years ago, in ancient Greece, they were decorated with the brightest colours imaginable. Time and the weather have taken its toll, slowly eating away at the bright paint work, leaving us with the pure white we see today.
Ouzo is magic Okay, not exactly. But this anise flavored liquor, which Greeks drink with appetizers, has a magical quality – it turns from clear to milky white when water or ice is added to it.…
Blue color can repel the evil eye It was believed that the color of sky- blue could ward off evil spirits. This is why you see doors, church cupolas, fences and window shutters in Greece painted this rich blue color.

U S E F U L L I N K S

© 2019 TRIXIE HELLAS E.E.
17o km Spaton Avenue 190 04 Spata, Attica, Greece Τel +30 210 6025538 Fax +30 216 7002868 mail: sales@trixiehellas.gr
Follow us:
Come Together 2022 Athens, Greece
Welcome to our Come Together! We are very excited to finally have the opportunity to host in partnership with TRIXIE your visit to this amazing, historical and magical land. Along with the program, we have prepared some background information about the sites we will be visiting. Also, we have included links to several other venues along with a few quirky greek facts to lighten your day. Last but not least, we thank our partners and friends from TRIXIE for making this engaging and supportive events an occasion we all look forward to attend.  Enjoy your visit!    “Kalos Irthate!” Welcome
A Brief History of “The Temple of Poseidon”, Sounion, Attica
Majestic Cape Sounion, a strategic point rising above the Aegean sea about 70 kilometers away from Athens in the southern region of Attica, was known by Ancient Greeks as the “Sacred Cape.” On top of this 60 meter cliff stands one of the most important sanctuaries in the region: the temple dedicated to Poseidon, God of the Sea. Built between 444 and 440 BC, the temple was constructed of marble from the valley of Agrilesa, about four kilometers north of the Sounio Cape. The architect is thought to be Ictinus (or Iktinos), who built the Temple of Hephaestus in the Ancient agora in Athens. He built the 16 columns at the Temple of Poseidon in a way that ensured they would stand the test of time and resist the harshness of the environment, and made the Doric columns more slender at the top so they would look taller. History and Legends As with many other monuments and sanctuaries around Greece, historical facts about the Temple of Poseidon in Sounion are intertwined with bits of legend. For example, it is thought to be the spot where Athenian King Aegeus killed himself by jumping off the cliff. Aegeus, who had positioned himself at Sounion to look out for the return of his son Theseus from Crete, saw the black sails on the ship and mistakenly thought Theseus had been killed by the Minotaur, a creature with the head of a bull and the body of a man. In fact, young Theseus was victorious but had forgotten to replace the black sails on his ship with white ones upon returning, which ultimately led to his father’s death. And so, in commemoration, Aegeus’ name was given to the Aegean Sea. And in the Odyssey, Homer wrote that Sounion was the place where King Menelaus of Sparta buried his helmsman, who died at his post while rounding the cape.
The Temple I n Greek mythology, Poseidon, brother of Zeus, was the God of the Sea, so it is no wonder that he was highly revered and worshipped in a country with over 13,500 kilometers of coastline. Ancient Greeks, especially seamen, believed storms were signs of Poseidon’s wrath, and therefore the temple at Cape Sounion was a sacred place where sailors and the general population came to offer animal sacrifices and other gifts to appease him and find favor. The temple was built according to a hexastyle plan, with a front portico with six Doric columns. It was rectangular, with a colonnade on all four sides, and had a frieze depicting the tale of Theseus and the Battle of Centaurs. The 16 columns, 15 of which are still standing today, are fewer in number compared with other temples dating from the same period, a feature common among other ancient temples built near the sea such as the Temple of Aphaia in Aegina. The remnants of the temple’s marble sculptures are now displayed at the National Archaeological Museum of Athens and the Mineralogical Museum of Lavrio, with one column on display at the British Museum in England. British Romantic poet Lord Byron carved his name at the base of one of the remaining columns during a visit in 1810 when he was touring Europe before rising to fame.
Changing of the Guard
This ceremony take place at the Presidential Mansion and at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, which is off Syntagma Square below the Hellenic Parliament. The Evzones , or Evzoni (which means “well- armed”), is the name of several historical elite light infantry and mountain units of the Greek Army. Today, it refers to the members of the Presidential Guard, an elite ceremonial unit that guards The Greek Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, The Presidential Mansion and The Gate of Evzones camp in Athens City. An Evzone or known as a Tsoliás stands in front of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the Greek Parliament . Every hour of the day, on the hour, there is a change of the guard. The duties of the soldiers are part of a ceremonial nature.
Every soldier guards for about an hour, 3 times in total every 48 hours. Throughout these 60 minutes, they have to stand perfectly still until it is time to switch with another guard. During the changing, they work in pairs so they can perfectly coordinate their moves. The soldiers of the Presidential Guard are selected according to their height, excellent physical condition and psychological state as well as character and morality. Furthermore they follow a hard training before they become part of this honorary unit. Apart from staying still, the soldiers must also not make any face or eye move and must not show any expression. Their uniform of the Presidential Guard has a historical meaning. It refers to the uniform of the Kleftes and Armatoloi, two groups of Greek warriors during the War of Independence against the Ottomans. In fact, the white skirt of the uniform has 400 folds to represent the 400 years of Ottoman occupation over the Greeks. The most visible item of this uniform is the fustanella, a kilt-like garment. Their distinctive dress turned them into a popular image for the Greek soldier, especially among foreigners.
Cleopatra was actually Greek While she was born in Egypt, Cleopatra was the last of the Macedonian Greek dynasty which ruled Egypt for nearly three centuries after Alexander the Great’s death in 323 BC.
Careful where you step! One of the quirkiest facts about Athens is that you can’t wear high heels when touring ancient historic sites like the Acropolis because you could “wound” the monuments. So for your own comfort and the protection of the ruins when visiting archeological sites in Greece, keep in mind to wear comfortable flat travel sandals or sport shoes…
Things are not always as they seem... The pristine, gleaming white, marble monuments, temples and statues of Greece , which we see today, didn’t start out that way. Originally, when they were created, thousands of years ago, in ancient Greece, they were decorated with the brightest colours imaginable. Time and the weather have taken its toll, slowly eating away at the bright paint work, leaving us with the pure white we see today.
Ouzo is magic Okay, not exactly. But this anise flavored liquor, which Greeks drink with appetizers, has a magical quality – it turns from clear to milky white when water or ice is added to it.…
Blue can repel the evil eye It was believed that the color of sky-blue could ward off evil spirits. This is why you see doors, church cupolas, fences and window shutters in Greece painted this rich blue color.

U S E F U L L I N K S